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The Sword and The Lotus
Talks given from 15/01/86 am to 13/02/86 pm, English Discourse series, 24 Chapters
The Sword and The Lotus Content : This volume captures the fast pace of Osho's six-week stay in Nepal, the birthplace of Buddha. He answers questions from his sannyasins in his hotel suite in the mornings and every evening from press in the hotel conference room: What is your message to the modern Nepalese Buddhists? What is your message for the Pope who is in India now? What do you think about the New Age movement? You teach us to be thankful to existence, but how can I be thankful to those who speak against you and try to destroy your work? With no white lies, no beating around the bush, no platitudes and no mincing of words, Osho's truth cuts clean with the skill of a master swordsman and the compassion symbolized in the lotus."
Take It Easy, Vol 1
Talks on Zen Buddhism, Talks given from 11/04/78 am to 24/04/78 am, English Discourse series, 14 Chapters
Take It Easy, Vol 1 Content : Of the verses of the fourteenth Zen master, Ikkyu, Osho says that the point is not that they are great poetry but a device to stir the heart, to touch the being, because Ikkyu is a mystic. A strange fellow indeed, one hot day Ikkyu took a wooden Buddha from the temple and tied him to a pole saying, "Now you too cool yourself." And another day he burned a Buddha to keep himself warm in the night saying, "Look at me—the buddha inside is shivering." In these discourses Osho covers a vast arena from the state of no-mind before birth, to man's obsession with greed; from the difference between mind and consciousness, to the ultimate failure of love-affairs; from "scientific mysticism," to the psychology of politicians and the importance of dreams."
Take It Easy, Vol 2
Talks on Zen Buddhism, Talks given from 25/04/78 am to 10/05/78 am, English Discourse series, 13 Chapters
Take It Easy, Vol 2 Content : Of the verses of the fourteenth Zen master, Ikkyu, Osho says that the point is not that they are great poetry but a device to stir the heart, to touch the being, because Ikkyu is a mystic. A strange fellow indeed, one hot day Ikkyu took a wooden Buddha from the temple and tied him to a pole saying, "Now you too cool yourself." And another day he burned a Buddha to keep himself warm in the night saying, "Look at me—the buddha inside is shivering." Through his commentaries on Zen master Ikkyu's verses, Osho shatters many of the cherished beliefs of man, and the meditator too. Togetherness, aloneness, the illusoriness of love and of meditation; the difficulty of understanding the simple; the difference between information and experience... There is something here for every intelligent reader!
The Tantra Vision, Vol 1
Talks on the Royal Song of Saraha, Talks given from 21/04/77 am to 30/04/77 am, English Discourse series, 10 Chapters
The Tantra Vision, Vol 1 Content : An absorbing book about the relationship between Saraha, an affluent young Brahmin, and a lower-cast arrowsmith woman - he as disciple, and she as his Tantric master. In Osho's understanding Tantra is one of the greatest of man's visions, a religion which respects rather than destroys individuality. Alternately speaking on the sutras of Saraha and answering seekers'questions, Osho describes what he calls the "Tantra map of inner consciousness," including the "four seals" or locks that open as couples move higher in meditation.
The Tantra Vision, Vol 2
Talks on the Royal Song of Saraha, Talks given from 01/05/77 am to 10/05/77 am, English Discourse series, 10 Chapters
The Tantra Vision, Vol 2 Content : An absorbing book about the relationship between Saraha, an affluent young Brahmin, and a lower-cast arrowsmith woman - he as disciple, and she as his Tantric master. In Osho's understanding Tantra is one of the greatest of man's visions, a religion which respects rather than destroys individuality. Alternately speaking on the sutras of Saraha and answering seekers'questions, Osho describes what he calls the "Tantra map of inner consciousness," including the "four seals" or locks that open as couples move higher in meditation.
Tantra : The Supreme Understanding
Discourses on Tilopa's Song of Mahamudra, Talks given from 11/02/75 am to 20/02/75 am, English Discourse series, 10 Chapters, Year published :1984
Tantra : The Supreme Understanding Content : Nothing much is known about the Indian master Tilopa, yet his mystical insight into Tantra in the form of a song passed on to his disciple Naropa, has lived on through the ages. In this series of discourses Osho speaks on Tilopa's verses, which contain many significant meditation techniques suitable for the modern-day seeker: "Mahamudra...is a total orgasm with the whole, with the universe. It is a melting into the source of being.... This is a song of Mahamudra. And who will sing it? Tilopa is no more. The orgasmic feeling itself is vibrating and singing.... I am also here to sing a song, but it can be given to you only when you are ready."
Tao : The Golden Gate, Vol 1
Discourses on Ko Hsuan's The Classic of Purity, Talks given from 11/06/80 am to 20/06/80 am, English Discourse series, 10 Chapters, Year published : 1980
Tao : The Golden Gate, Vol 1 Content : Osho refers to these ancient discourses as the most profound insights into nature—not tenets of a doctrine or philosophical treatises but existential insights. Of their originator, the famous 6th-century scholar Ko Hsuan, nothing is known except that he is an enlightened master of the caliber of Lao Tzu. Osho explains why Tao is called "the golden gate"—it is to indicate that God is not a person but an entrance, an opening that happens internally when the seeker is ready. Osho also answers questions related to discipline versus repression, fidelity in marriage, happiness and marriage, death, the pain of growth, creativity and religion and, amongst others, why God created Indians!
Tao : The Golden Gate, Vol 2
Discourses on Ko Hsuan's The Classic of Purity, Talks given from 21/06/80 am to 30/06/80 am, English Discourse series, 10 Chapters, Year published : 1980
Tao : The Golden Gate, Vol 2 Content : The way of Tao takes us meandering through such topics as the usefulness of jokes in provoking greater awareness, the role of one's conditioning in creating prejudice, and the unconscious strategies we all adopt that close us to the vitality and change that permeates existence. Among questioners is a priest who challenges Osho's statement that religions have created sexual repression, and one visitor who wants to know if he should become a disciple.
Tao : The Pathless Path, Vol 1
Talks on extracts from "The Lieh Tzu", Talks given from 11/02/77 am to 24/02/77 am, English Discourse series, 14 Chapters
Tao : The Pathless Path, Vol 1 Content : Osho talks about stories based on The Book of Lieh Tzu attributed to a 5th-century Chinese mystic. It is not known if Lieh Tzu ever existed, or if the parables attributed to him were written by one person or many. More significant than their origin are the parables themselves, and the way in which Osho takes them and opens the door to the mysteries they contain. In the course of his commentary and his answers to questions, Osho speaks of Beckett and Buddha, Gurdjieff and Hitler, Einstein and Confucius. He also talks about psychotherapy and Taoism, Taoism and escapism, esoterica and humor; jealousy, possessiveness, the nature of senility, and falling asleep during his talks.
Tao : The Pathless Path,Vol 2
Talks on extracts from "The Lieh Tzu", Talks given from 25/02/77 am to 10/03/77 am, English Discourse series, 14 Chapters
Tao : The Pathless Path,Vol 2 Content : In these talks on Lieh Tzu, Osho calls Tao "the pathless path" because, he says, it has a different quality - the quality of freedom, anarchy and chaos. "Anything that is an imposition, a discipline, an order imposed externally only serves to distract the seeker from his path." In addition to commenting on these stories attributed to Lieh Tzu, Osho answers questions about marriage, intimacy, the possibility of Tantra merging with Tao, and the relationship of Tao to the notion of "doing your own thing."


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